In a day

It was time to reassess just what (art-wise) I could achieve in one-ish sitting.
Seriously, each non commissioned drawing takes me between 80-120 hours (maybe more).
Translated: weeks of work.

The one question that I have not wanted been to scared to answer face but wich I have been asking for a while now, has been tackled and ... answered.

Am I able to produce a wee bit quality in one day?
Can I "perform" without all the time and detail and work and rework and endless thought?
Can I get to the important nitty gritty and feel pleased with the result?
Can I quieten the nagging "you -can-you-only-draw-slowly-and un-sponteneously" voice?

Yes, yes, yes and YES!

Here's the proof: Snaffles.
Upping the anti (no comfort zone for me!), I used new paper (Fabriano), a new medium (Nitram Charcoal) and a new time frame (one day i.e: 6 hours drawing time).
Drank two coffees, pumped up the volume and got cracking...

Super chuffed with the result!
Snaffles is a drawing that won't win any shows or awards but ,to me, it means the world 'cause it simply screams: I CAN!


Snaffles
charcoal on paper
28x30 cm

Comments

Lissa Rachelle said…
I love it Sheona! Definitely doesn't look like a "quickie"! :)
Margo said…
Good for you, and I like Snaffles very much!
Thank-you Rachelle :D Over coming the nagging voice had to be done and quickly! Surprised and how much I was able to comfortably render in a short time. Guess it's the hours I've spent on this subject that helped ;)
Margo, thank you for the thumbs up: I appreciated it very much :D
Jo Castillo said…
This is superb! I think your practice and skill took over. Just lovely!

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